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Make Them Hear You

I’ve been thinking about what to add to the flood of voices we’ve heard about racism and, more specifically, police brutality and the murder of George Floyd. I want to remind our employees, our customers, our partners, and our friends in the industry, that Molecule values justice, and that we stand with America (our country and its people).

There’s really nothing I can say that’s not brutally obvious:

  • America’s original sin was slavery.
  • Many of racism’s roots were there.
  • The Civil War largely killed slavery, but not racism.
  • The Civil Rights Act didn’t kill racism.
  • Pretending color didn’t matter, as my generation did (with the best of intentions), didn’t kill racism.
  • Electing a Black president didn’t kill racism.
  • We have to kill racism in our hearts, in our subconscious minds, in our living rooms, in our families, in private and in public.

We have, apparently, a fair number of ill-trained and/or racist people who hold the power of life and death in their hands, and who are charged with keeping us safe. But instead, they get away with murder — over, and over again. Something is badly broken in America's police forces. It has been 28 years since Rodney King’s beating, and the subsequent riots, opened my eyes to police brutality. From everything I read, we’ve shuffled the chairs around a bit — but in some places, we haven’t changed a whole lot.

There’s a lot — a lot we need to do as a society, to fix this. Justin Amash’s “Ending Qualified Immunity Act”, on its surface, seems to be a great start. Nobody should be above the law; especially laws related to murder. There’s also lots more we can do, from a policy perspective:

  • Making sure to train police and first responders better, so they're less likely to shoot to kill (helping avoid cases like Botham Shem Jean), and so they're better at de-escalation.
  • Paying police, teachers, and our other public servants generously (not minimally, or simply adequately) — so we can get the best, most qualified individuals to do these critical jobs.
  • Making sure we understand that slavery in America lasted 200 years, and was followed by another 100 years of written-into-law racism that ended only 56 years ago. It’s not even close to the time when we can stop paying attention via policies like affirmative action.

But the most important thing we can do, as private citizens, is to speak. Speak to our racist uncles at the Thanksgiving table. Speak to our friends who joke about racist things. Speak to our coworkers and employees about what racism means to you. Speak to the person who wonders if maybe George Floyd encouraged his own death in some way. Speak. Without violence, but loudly — like our common heroes: MLK, Gandhi, and Nelson Mandela. As E.L. Doctorow and Stephen Flaherty’s fictional character Coalhouse Walker sang in his dying minutes: “Make them hear you.”

Make them f@#%ing hear you, America. Make them hear you.

ValuesPeople

Welcome, Richard, Luke, & Syed

Molecule is growing! So far this year, we have added to our dev, customer success, and sales teams. We've done a quick Q&A with our additions to the sales team so you can get to know Richard Reedstrom, Luke 'Hawaiian-shirt' Kremer, and Syed Sohaib better. Stay tuned to meet the other new faces that have joined Molecule.

Richard Reedstrom

1.  Let’s start at the beginning. Where did you grow up? What led you to a career in sales?

I grew up here in Houston. I'm passionate about improving people's lives, and I've found that this bonds incredibly well with sales. Every day I help people end frustrating battles with old systems and methods by providing real solutions. I get to give people back hours of their lives. For me, it comes down to figuring out how we can make our customers' lives better.

2.  Why did you decide to join Molecule?

When I first heard about Molecule, it looked like an interesting company with a ton of potential. I had always wanted to work with a genuinely innovative/disruptive technology, and the more I found out about Molecule, the more I fell in love. The underlying technology, the company values, and the team culture resonated with me one hundred percent. I'm thrilled to be a part of such an awesome group of people doing incredible things.

3.  What is something that you’ve already learned about the industry or company that has surprised you?

Not every solution that claims to be cloud-based actually is a true cloud-based (multi-tenant) solution.

4.  For fun, what are your top three favorite apps?

1 Second Everyday, Tidal, and Audible.

5.  Since you’re in a sales position, let’s ask the obvious: what’s the most compelling reason why someone should want to buy Molecule?

Everything just works. We believe you shouldn’t have to fight with your software. Instead, Molecule works in harmony with you and your process.

Luke Kremer

1. Let’s start at the beginning. Where did you grow up? What led you to a career in sales?

I grew up in Papillion, a suburb of Omaha, Nebraska. I enjoy the relationship building and challenges that a sales person faces.

2. What is something that you’ve already learned about the industry or company that has surprised you?

I've been fascinated by renewable energy credit trading.

3. One of the things Molecule prides itself on is the time savings our software gives customers. More than one person has said that we’ve saved them two hours each day. If you were given two extra hours each day, how would you choose to spend them?

I’d have a tee time set two hours earlier each day; I could probably get a full 18 in before 7 pm.

4. For fun, what are your top three favorite apps?

Snapchat, Yelp, and Instagram.

5. Since you’re in a sales position, let’s ask the obvious: what’s the most compelling reason why someone should want to buy Molecule?

Molecule is future-proof software that looks and performs like it was made in 2019. We provide world-class service, free upgrades, and no extra implementation fees.

Syed Sohaib

1.  Let’s start at the beginning. Where did you grow up? What led you to a career in sales?

I grew up in Karachi, Pakistan. We moved to Stamford, Connecticut when I was in the middle of high school, which kickstarted my American dream. I graduated from the University of Connecticut (UConn) with an International Business Management degree and a focus in Finance. I took a marketing course titled ‘Professional Selling,’ and the final was to pitch a mock product and replace the incumbent provider. After the presentation my professor asked why I was not a marketing/sales major. According to him, I had a natural ability to be successful in a professional sales role. Long story short, I had an opportunity to join the sales team at ThomsonReuters, selling data solutions. I truly enjoyed the experience and challenge of bringing the right solutions to our clients/prospects. Ever since then I have been in sales and business development, and I enjoy every bit of it. Well, perhaps not CRMs!

2.  Why did you decide to join Molecule?

After trying my luck in different industries after ThomsonReuters, I wanted to get back into the financial services technology space. Molecule's solution "wow-ed" and made me excited about bringing it to market. For companies that have a need and utilize old technology for calculating P&L, position, and risk, Molecule is a game changer both from the ease of use and time-saving perspective.

3.  What is something that you’ve already learned about the industry or company that has surprised you?

The deep dive into the power market made me realize how challenging it is to learn, trade, and deal in this space.

4.  One of the things Molecule prides itself on is the time savings our software gives customers. More than one person has said that we’ve saved them two hours each day. If you were given two extra hours each day, how would you choose to spend them?

Spend more time with my family, learn a new language, restore and upgrade a Range Rover Defender 110, and go off the grid for a bit.

5.  For fun, what are your top three favorite apps?

I like puzzles, so Progress & Super Sharp. Proshot for some light photography and Flipboard to stay updated on tech, sports, travel, and autos, etc.

We are not finished either. Personally, I'm always recruiting for the sales team. Word on the wire is that we just hired a new developer in Spain! If you like what you have seen of Molecule so far, hit us up. We are always in the market for the best talent.

PeopleSales

Things Are Looking A Little Different Around Here

If you’ve been watching us, you’ll notice a few things have changed around our website. Specifically, we overhauled the information architecture to help users answers their questions about Molecule more quickly. Now, you’ll find specific use cases informed by how our customers use Molecule today, directly on the home page.

More work, however, was our long-developed update to our logo and branding! When we launched Molecule in 2012, we had literally no code and no customers, but a strong vision of where we wanted to go. Since then, the many users of our platform have expressed clear preferences of where Molecule should go next: physical logistics/scheduling, and easy connectivity with upstream and downstream systems.

Our new branding reflects this while keeping to our core mission of easily, reliably managing risk for commodities portfolios. To talk more about the concept, here’s our designer, Jay Jimenea:

Exchange, transfer, flow, connectedness. Those are some of the concepts we wanted to reflect in our new logo. Those concepts represent motion, and there’s a ton of motion in Molecule. So many trades flow through Molecule on a daily basis, and with physical logistics and scheduling on the horizon, even more data will flow through the application. In addition, Molecule is becoming increasingly interconnected with upstream and downstream enterprise systems via our APIs. We thought we should capture this in the logo. While the methane logo provided a nice chemical icon to represent commodities, it did not visually capture the activity that transpires within Molecule. At quick glance, that logo could represent a chemical engineering firm if not for the word “software.” So, how could we visually capture motion and other desired concepts while maintaining the characteristics we liked from the previous design?

We achieved motion by using a pair of red tracks to form the letter “M” in the negative space between them. The nodes on the tracks are intended to represent points similar to what you might see on routes in map applications, train routes, or circuits on a circuit board. Each node is either a start or an end point. This creates a bidirectional movement between the nodes, guiding the eye back and forth between them. There’s movement created when just looking at the “M.” The nodes are also not far in appearance from the atoms in the methane icon.

Molecule is a software company that prides itself on simplicity for our users. Molecule’s UI removes the extraneous so users can focus on what they care about without distraction. Just like our application, we felt that we could remove from the logo as well. The word “software” was something we could remove if tech was represented elsewhere. The absence of “software” streamlines the design by removing clutter, and the circuit-like appearance of the “M” icon is undeniably a technology statement. That attribute is more than sufficient in reflecting the tech space and, in turn, software.

Molecule is bold in its messaging and aspirations, yet sensitive to human factors in its usability. The acute angles and sharp points of the new icon reflect the bold and aggressive attitude of the company, while the rounded nodes reflect Molecule’s sensible side. The connected “M” and “O” in the typeface was something we did like about the prior logo. It was the one quality that reflected motion, so we wanted to keep that posture intact. Plus, this strengthens the connectedness concept. The same bold lines and sharp angles from the new icon are mirrored in the “M” to extend the attitude into the Gotham typeface. (Sameer likes to call this the Vampire M.) The stylized “O” looks like an eye with its hawkish brow, further complementing the bold stance.

Gotham has been Molecule’s selected typeface from the beginning, and it continues to be. The font will not change in the Molecule application, marketing materials, or website. Gotham Black’s thick lines and wide curves continue to accompany our bold messaging and sensible style all at the same time. We love it.

We also still love our methane icon. We love it so much that it has also been updated for continued use. The new icon takes on a more simplified look, with removed outlines and updated shaping. The outlines were often lost when seen at smaller dimensions, so in the spirit of simplifying, they were removed. The icon will not take center stage as it used to, but it will continue to be seen throughout Molecule’s visual marketing.

Every angle and edge in the new logo is intentional and sculpted to convey exactly what Molecule is. We hope you like it!"

We’re proud of where we’ve come as a company, and we’re proud of our new design. We would love to hear your feedback and thoughts about the new look and feel, so please don’t hesitate to contact us at info@molecule.io.

DesignUXPeople

Welcome, Paul Kaisharis

Paul-Kaisharis Buy me some peanuts and crackerjacks because 2018 continues to be a whirlwind year for the Molecule team. One of the coolest additions to our disruptive talent line-up is our new SVP Software Engineering, Paul Kaisharis.

Earlier this year, Molecule welcomed Paul, and we are delighted that he hopped on board to run our development team.

Remember when the Astros brought on Justin Verlander? Okay… we’re not approaching the end of a sports season and there was no impending trade deadline, but we’re still pretty pumped about Paul joining our team.

Both Molecule’s CEO and VP of Design worked with Paul in previous positions. Jay, VP of Design, was quick to endorse Paul as a candidate by simply stating, “he’s good people.” Sameer, our CEO, added, “Paul has an uncanny ability to spot hot companies in our industry and join them just as they are about to blow up.”

That’s right. Molecule is about to dominate in all divisions. In the most awesome ways imaginable. Paul’s addition to our line-up brings more home run hitting power to a team that is consistently beating its nearest competitors in every inning.

Plus, the guy has one heck of a batting average. In 2006 Paul joined SolArc and helped shape the software that was eventually sold to OpenLink. Paul’s next stop was SunGard where he managed massive product development teams. Most recently, he was the Global Head, Product Development for Energy with Fidelity Information Services.

Pedigree aside, Paul brings a disciplined development process to complement our bleeding edge tech. He has a tech-agnostic view that fits our open source core values. And for those keeping score, we are dead serious about our VALUES.

We see good things on the horizon with Paul on the team. 2018 is the year Molecule swings for the fences and takes the pennant. Now, about Kate Upton...

People

Two Extra Hours

We give back, starting with our team and our customers. It’s part of our core values. We build beautiful software that puts those hours back into your day that normally evaporate while you struggle to find data in spreadsheets and antiquated software.

One of the most satisfying things one of our customers has told us is that Molecule has given him back two working hours every day! TWO. HOURS. That’s a lot of time.

This got us to thinking: what would we do with 120 extra minutes in our day? So, we surveyed our team, and they had some good ideas. We would love to hear what you would do with Molecule at your disposal, adding two hours per day to spend, as Westley would say, “as you wish.”

Paul | SVP, Software Engineering

The house reno list grows bigger by the week. Tackling this would burn down some of the debt that has built up over the years and earn some points with the wife.

My family and I enjoy athletics, but I'm not always able to make all the different events spread across our three kids. Two extra hours a day would definitely allow me to catch up on some missed family time.

Finally, I would certainly catch up on reading and podcasts that I subscribe to so I can keep the mental muscles in shape.

Krzysztof | Software Engineer

One thing I’d like to do this year, although I don’t know if it’s possible because I don’t speak Japanese, is to try to find some way to teach kids how to write software.

Our society relies on software more and more, and sadly the education system hasn’t caught up with it. But it’s such a fun time to be young. Projects like Raspberry Pi, Arduino, etc. enable anyone to build some really interesting stuff, not just software but hardware. Sadly, the software leaves a lot of room for improvement. I don’t think these sort of things are taught properly. People focus too much on the skill (e.g. here’s how you write some JavaScript) and not enough on the principle and philosophy, which is more important in the long run.

I could probably easily pull this off if I was fluent in Japanese, but since I’m not, I’m going to start with making friends at various meetups here (Hacker News meetup, gaijins in startups, etc.) and take it from there.

In more general terms, just share knowledge.

Kyle B. | Sales

I would go to the gym and get the beach bod I always wanted. I'd go to the grocery store and cook more often. In the summer there would be more time for golf and basketball after work. I'd be able to commit more time to working on a side job, like real estate. Spending more time with family and friends would lead to a happier out of work lifestyle.

Kyle M. | Customer Success

I’d get a hell of a lot of work done building out and then enjoying my garage workshop. And, hopefully be in shape again like I was about 10 years ago.

Mary | Software Engineer

I’d split the time practicing on my piano and guitar. I've always wanted to play a live show, but you’ve gotta get practice in first.

Jeff | Software Engineer

By leaving early, I would be able to beat traffic. Thus, it would end up being more than just two extra non-work hours of my day.

With the extra time, I would have more time for entertainment purposes rather than spending the entire evening finishing up daily chores and maintenance around the house (all while feeling exhausted from the traffic).

Jay | UX Design

Dad of two in middle and high school, we leave the house before sunrise to beat the first bell. After a day of slaying pixels and stylesheets, it's after sunset! Gaining two hours a day just may allow for more time outside to bike, longboard, or skate at the skatepark.

Zeeshan | Customer Success

Two extra non-work hours is more time I have to spend with my loved ones, and to work on improving myself - whether it be physically, mentally, spiritually, emotionally. Always strive to be a better individual than you were yesterday.

Dustin | VP, Sales

The dad in me wants to say spend every second with my two boys. But, I also would not mind finally building that brick oven in my backyard for baking sourdough bread. Maybe shake the dust off my drums and bring the skills back up to rock'n'roll days. Naps are amazing too.

Joe | VP, Product Implementation

As a new father, I would spend it with my son. Or sleep. I need so much sleep right now.

Melanie | Marketing

So. Many. Options. Write, read, spend more time learning Italian (DuoLingo is great, but I could do so much more!), see friends more often, learn to cook without starting a fire, and oh, and exercise. Ummmm, I might need five hours rather than two.

People